ARISTEAN
CALENDAR

JEWISH
IMPORTANT DAYS

 

 

Jewish Event

Jewish Calendar

Aristean Calendar

Month

Date

Month

Date

Day

Rosh Hashana (New Year)

Tishri

1-2

October

1-2

 Mon-Tue

Fast of Gedaliah

Tishri

3

October

3

Wed

Yom Kipuur (Day of Atonement)

Tishri

10

October

10

Wed

Sukkot (Tabernacles)

Tishri

15-21

October

15-21

Mon-Sun

Shemini Atzeret (Eighth Day of Solemn Assembly)

Tishri

22

October

22

Mon

Simhat Torah (Rejoicing of the Law)

Tishri

23

October

23

Tue

 

Heshvan

 

November

 

 

Hanukka (Festival of Lights) begins

Kislev

25

December

25

Tue

Hanukka ends

Tevet

2 or 3

January

2 or 3

Tue or Wed

Fast

Tevet

10

January

10

Wed

New Year for Trees (Mishna)

Shevat

15

February

15

Thu

Fast of Esther

Adar

13

March

13

Thu

Purim (Lots)

Adar

14-15

March

14-15

Fri-Sat

Pesah (Passover)

Nisan

15-22

April

15-22

Mon-Mon

Israel Independence Day

Iyyar

5 (14)

May

5 (14)

Mon (Wed)

Shavuot (Feast of Weeks [Pentecost])

Sivan

6-7

June

6-7

Thu-Fri

Fast (Mishna)

Tammuz

17

July

17

Wed

(Mishna)

Av

9

August

9

Fri

 

Elul

 

September

 

 

 

I am presenting the proposal for the adoption of the Aristean calendar by the Jews. This is to replace the present lunisolar Jewish calendar which they adopted from the Babylonians in 587 BC.  Prior to that, they had been using a lunar calendar since their departure from Egypt in 1250 BC.  It marked off the number of years from that exodus.  Also, the 15th to the 22nd of its first month was designated as the festival of Pesah as commanded by God in the Torah.  Since a lunar year is 11 days shorter than a solar year, Pesah wandered through the seasons.  It was in 358/359 AD when the patriarch Hillel II incorporated the religious lunar calendar into the civil lunisolar calendar and fixed Pesah in the month of Nisan.

 

The above table shows the dates in the Aristean calendar when the Jewish feasts occur.  Please note that the months in both calendars have a one-to-one correspondence.  Hence, the Jewish month of Tishri is in October; Heshvan, November; Kislev, December; Tevet, January; Shevat, February; Adar, March; Nisan, April; Iyyar, May; Sivan, June; Tammuz, July; Av, August; and Elul, September.  The date in the Jewish calendar is the same as in the Aristean calendar.  For instance, Sukkot is from Tishri 15-21.  In the Aristean calendar, it falls on the same date, i.e. October 15-21.

 

One thing that may have to be decided by the Israelis is its Independence Day.  It occurred on Iyyar 5 in 1948.  That year when the State of Israel was proclaimed, it was May 14 in the Gregorian calendar.

 

One advantage for the Jews adopting the Aristean calendar is that the day of the week when the feast falls is the same year after year.  Although Pesah and Sukkot fall on the same dates and consequently, same days of the week, every year, other feasts may have to be adjusted to give maximum benefit, such as long weekends.

 

I am hoping that the Jews will adopt the Aristean calendar primarily because it is from God as shown by the signs God has manifested.  These signs may be read under the topic “Signs Behind God’s Calendar”.

 

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Jewish important days